More about Mingi

While many remote Omo Valley tribes live peacefully and pastorally, fear and superstition still exist in the valley. Unfortunately, some of the tribes believe “curses” or evil spirits will bring ill fortune (drought, famine, disease, death) to their villages if Mingi children aren’t executed. 

Since tribal elders believe Mingi children are a curse upon the land, the execution of all Mingi children is mandated. The Kara Tribe recently ended this practice (thanks to the work of Lale Labuko and Omo Hope), although there Hamer tribe sadly still practices Mingi.

 

Stopping the tribal practice of Mingi is one of Omo Hope’s biggest goals. We believe this can be achieved by educating and supporting the rescued children and their tribes.

Types of Mingi

Girl Mingi

Tribal elders often deem babies born out-of-wedlock as Mingi. Many couples cannot afford to marry due to expensive dowries; therefore, their babies may be deemed as Mingi after birth.

Woman Mingi

Married couples whose unions or pregnancies go unapproved may later have their babies deemed as Mingi.

Teeth Mingi

Children who chip a baby tooth or get their top teeth before the bottom ones may be deemed as Mingi by tribal elders.

Ending Mingi

According to our estimates, at least 200-300 infants and children are killed each year because of Mingi. Until recently, the Kara, Wanna, and Hamer tribes of Omo Valley practiced Mingi. Thanks to the work of Lale Labuko and Omo Hope, the Kara and Banna tribes are committed to ending Mingi. 

The Hamer tribe comes with a decentralized tribal governance and an estimated population of 50,000. Unfortunately, they also still practice Mingi. At this time, Omo Hope continues communicating with Hamer elders, mothers, young adults, and government officials. Our goals are to help educate the Hamer tribe and put a permanent end to Mingi.

Lale Labuko: Rescuing Children of the Omo | Nat Geo Live

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